Mask

Description
Created by craftsman Ha Ko Tani, this face mask depicts the character of a male lion called Sasano. Ka’gura is a ritual dance that has its roots in Japanese Shinto folklore, and which predates Noh theatre.
Accession Loan No.
30/1973/1
Collection Class
Clothing and accessories
Common Name
mask
Simple Name
mask
Full Name
face mask (kagura)
Period Classification
Meiji period (1868 - 1912)
Production Year High
1868
Production Town
Yokohama?
Production Country
Japan
Production Area Region
East Asia
Production Continent
Asia
Family Group

Material
wood; pigment
Function Name
disguise
Function Detail
The word kagura means "place of the gods" but it is written with characters which mean "music of the gods". Kagura, whether it is performed in the sacred precints of the Imperial Palace in Tokyo or in some small village shrine, always signifies a musical performance intended as an offering and an entertainment to the ancient gods of Japan. Carved and painted wood mask, believed to have been made before the 1868 Meiji restoration. The mask, wig and costume elements were used for the role of a father lion called 'Sasanoo' for the play, 'The life of Sasanoo'. On the reverse of the mask is the engraved signature of the craftsman Ha Ko Tani. Only three other masks by this maker are known to exist in Japan. They are exhibited at the Hagiwara Museum in Yokohama, Kanagawa province and have the status of national treasures.
Collection Area Region
E
Collection Continent
Asia

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