Bag

Accession Loan No.
37/1968/1
Simple Name
bag
Common Name
bag
Production Country
United Kingdom: England
Material
silk; beads; gilt metal
Period Classification
Inter War (1918-1939)
Collection Class
Clothing and accessories
Production Area Region
Northern Europe
Production Continent
Europe
Production Date
c 1920
Family Group

Created At
2016-10-13 15:45:57
Updated At
2020-01-28 11:42:56

    There are 14 comments

    • Teresa Cielinska, student in English class at Belmont Chapel
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I like the handbag. It’s small. I like small handbags.

    • Ruth Flanagan, teacher of English at Belmont Chapel
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      We all love the handbag, we can all see ourselves wearing it. You have your mirror and a place for your lipstick and mobile phone…

    • Zoe Isopova, housewife and English student
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I think this lady who owned it would be very careful and well organised to look after it properly. Of course, it was an expensive item – why not? And now we benefit from that, we can see it. It’s something very English, to keep things nicely. Not in Russia – people would throw them away and maybe not value it so much. Not everyone, of course! Not me!

    • Min from Exeter
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      [I sewed my son’s] keys into his bag so he wouldn’t lose it (talking about small purse attached inside bag)…. He always loses his keys. When he went to high school, he was really embarrassed at having a key on elastic inside his bug, but I said, “When you stop losing your keys, I’ll take it out!”

    • Shelley Tobin, RAMM Assistant Costume Curator
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      [The purse would be]… for special things that you wouldn’t want to lose, like theatre tickets.

    • Zoe Isopova, housewife and English student
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      A little bag for a special time out, to visit guests or to go to a horse-riding race. Because women in those days would have worn a pretty dress, hat and the handbag. I like it very much. It’s really pretty. I would buy it nowadays to wear it. In my country we have the same style. It would be for a rich woman. [Was it] made 100 years ago? The little purse, what would it be for?

    • Min from Exeter
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      This animates it, brings it to life – colourful.

    • Shelley Tobin, RAMM Assistant Costume Curator
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I do! Maybe it is because you are thinking of black and white films and drab suits. Colour and pattern were very important then.

    • Min from Exeter
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      You just don’t think of colour in the 1920s and 30s, do you?

    • Shelley Tobin, RAMM Assistant Costume Curator
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I’m sure if [we could] visit the 17th and 18th centuries, it would be interesting to see their taste in clothing and furnishings. [We think of them as] so dark, but they had really exciting colour coordinations for furnishings.

    • Min from Exeter
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      It might have been about class.

    • Shelley Tobin, RAMM Assistant Costume Curator
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      It might have been about people having more disposable income…. There was a huge interest in… buying reproduction furniture… making your own gloves, leatherware, baskets, making little brooches….

    • Min from Exeter
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      It’s pretty, beautiful…. It’s gorgeous…. Do you think the garden theme was something to do with families – husbands, wives, children – starting to go out together?

    • Shelley Tobin, RAMM Assistant Costume Curator
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      There was a particular fondness for things with gardens on in the 1930s…. It was a really popular image.

    Tell Us What You Think

    Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *