Roof tile in the form of a human face

Description
Tiles like these were attached to the outside of the roof of the Roman bath-house. They were decorative, and functional as they protected the roof timbers from the rain.
Accession Loan No.
403/1990/5
Simple Name
tile (roof)
Full Name
antefix tile in the form of a female human face
Collector / Excavator
Exeter Museums Archaeological Field Unit
Collection Country
United Kingdom: England
Common Name
roof tile in the form of a human face
Material
ceramic
Period Classification
Roman (43-410)
Collection Class
Exeter archaeology
Collection Contintent
Europe
Collection Area Region
Northern Europe
Production Year Low
60
Production Year High
65
Collection Town
Exeter
Collection County
Devon
Collection Site Name
Cathedral Close
Family Group

Dimensions
whole length 200 mm; whole W 175 mm; whole depth 40 mm
Created At
2016-10-13 15:45:39
Updated At
2020-01-28 11:42:46

    There are 7 comments

    • Julia from Exwick
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      The Roman fella looks unhappy.

    • Anil Lee, moved to Exeter from Istanbul in 1988
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      It looks very ugly, like a witch or an angry woman. Why would they put a woman there? Clenched teeth of anger. Or not a very talented artist. If it is terracotta, I presume it’s on the outside. Unless it’s to tell it’s a women’s bath only – no men allowed.

    • (Margaret Hammond, painter, in a Moving Here session organised by RAMM Exeter)
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      The chipped lip gives him more agonised pain with the lips pulled back, teeth exposed and neck back. Maybe [the artist] was thinking of someone who has suffered.

    • Margaret Hammond, painter
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      [Terracotta] is not very robust or permanent. Why did they make it from something so crumbly? It looks as if it was not carved but moulded with thumbs. It looks like someone in agony. A man with long hair. I’ve worked with clay. It could have been made in a mould.

    • (Alan, local historian in Exwick History Group, in a Moving Here session organised by RAMM)
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      Why make so much effort for something so high up? It’s like gargoyles…. Artisans always took pride in work.

    • Jenny Durrant, assistant curator of antiquities
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      It would have been on eaves of the bathhouse at a great height.

    • (Jenny Durrant, RAMM Assistant Curator of Antiquities, in a Moving Here session organised by RAMM)
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      This is from the bath house just by the cathedral. It’s from one of the earliest stone buildings in the country…. It would have been on eaves of the bathhouse at a great height…. I love it because it’s a contemporary image of a person. Or is it a god? I don’t know.

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