Bonnet

Description
This pretty bonnet is a very youthful style dating from c.1848-52. It is made of silk-lined straw plait and crinoline (horsehair) lace, and trimmed with blond (silk) lace and artificial roses assembled from cotton and wax. The fancy straw ‘lace’ and trim are probably of Swiss origin, while the bonnet appears to have been assembled in England. The bonnet may have been part of an expensive trousseau, but of more interest is the fact that it retains a rare original printed paper label. The label reveals that the milliner was a Mrs. Bell of 34 Wigmore Street, in the heart of the Hanover Square area of London, well known for dressmaking and millinery establishments. The line ‘Milliner & C.’ suggests that she supplied more than hats and indeed a Mrs. Bell is known to have worked in the West End during the first half of the nineteenth century.
Accession Loan No.
82/1929/18
Collection Class
Clothing and accessories
Common Name
bonnet
Simple Name
bonnet
Dimensions
crown depth 120 mm; brim width 260 mm
Production Person Surname
Bell
Period Classification
Victorian (1837-1901)
Production Date
c 1850
Production Year Low
1848
Production Year High
1852
Production Town
London
Production Country
United Kingdom: England
Production Area Region
Northern Europe
Production Continent
Europe
Family Group

Material
straw (lace straw); horse hair (crinoline); silk taffeta

    There are 5 comments

    • Roxanne Pintilie, student in English class at Belmont Chapel
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      It looks like one in, what’s that film? Gone with the Wind…. Such care.

    • Zoe Isopova, housewife and English student
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      [It looks like a] summer hat to protect her from the sun, modern for a young lady. Handmade, very pretty. In my country there’s a similar one. Not for a poor woman, but maybe not so rich either – middle class. I like pretty things.

    • Teresa Cielinska, student in English class at Belmont Chapel
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      I like this the best. You would have to be very clever to make it and it would help you cool in summer. It’s beautiful.

    • Shelley Tobin, RAMM Assistant Costume Curator
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      It was just for outdoors in the afternoon. You would always wear a hat outdoors and a cap indoors if you were married.

    • Ruth Flanagan, teacher of English at Belmont Chapel
      22 March 2017 | Permalink | Reply to this comment

      My grandmother lived in a crescent near Regent Street (in London) and she painted herself in a miniature wearing a hat like this. Would a lady wear this all day?

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